‘Making Montgomery Clift’ Looks at the Manufacturing of a Movie Star After Death

The tragedy and sadness of Montgomery Clift’s life is well-documented. As a montage in Robert Anderson Clift and Hillary Demmon’s documentary, Making Montgomery Clift, shows, the actor with the impossibly chiseled face was referred to as a “beautiful loser,” “tortured,” and suffering “the longest suicide in Hollywood history.” But Clift and Demmon, who never met the actor before his passing in 1966, set out to tell a story wholly divorced from those assertions. Indeed, Making Montgomery Clift isn’t the story of the rise and fall of a man fractured by his homosexuality, as has been repeated through the decades. Instead, their documentary seeks to look at how personas are shaped after death, and how the need to promote homosexuality as something to fear fueled much of what we know about Clift, leading to a documentary more intrigued at looking at the lives left behind, then the one lived.

Read more about ‘Making Montgomery Clift’ Looks at the Manufacturing of a Movie Star After Death

‘Love, Cecil’ Director Lisa Immordino Vreeland Talks Art, Elegance and Cecil Beaton

Lisa Immordino Vreeland is a woman who enjoys the the world of art. Vreeland has already shined her light on two creators already, in her 2011 debut Diana Vreeland: The Has to Travel as well as her 2015 work Peggy Guggenheim: Art Addict, and looks at the man who made nearly every facet of popular culture turn. Love, Cecil is an incisive look at author and designer Cecil Beaton, lifting the veil to explore a man fraught with insecurities. Vreeland talked to Film Radar about Love, Cecil, falling in love with the “bright young things” of the 1930s and more.

Read more about ‘Love, Cecil’ Director Lisa Immordino Vreeland Talks Art, Elegance and Cecil Beaton

Filmmaker Alejandro Montoya Marin Discusses Robert Rodriguez and ‘Rebel Without a Crew’

Mexican director Alejandro Montoya Marin doesn’t want studios to hire him “because my last name ends with a vowel.” The director of the feature film Monday is a man who, regardless of ethnicity, “loves movies” and hopes to make the leap towards feature-filmmaking in the immediate future. Monday is certainly indicative of Montoya Marin’s unique voice. Created in the vein of Martin Scorsese’s 1985 comedy After Hours, the story follows Jim (Jamie H. Jung) who loses his job, his girl, and his home in one day. As luck would have it, Jim soon gets wrapped up with two hitwomen, played by Anna Schatte and Sofia Embid, who force him to execute a prominent Colombian drug dealer…who just happens to be dating Jim’s girl. Montoya Marin took some time to sit with Film Radar and discuss working with Robert Rodriguez, making a film for $7,000, and the issues involved in being a Latino filmmaker.

Read more about Filmmaker Alejandro Montoya Marin Discusses Robert Rodriguez and ‘Rebel Without a Crew’