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Karie (site owner) Written by Karie (site owner)
Mar. 21, 2012 | 2:48 PM





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HOLLYWOOD HERITAGE AND PARAMOUNT GIVE HERITAGE MUSEUM A FACELIFT

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HOLLYWOOD HERITAGE AND PARAMOUNT GIVE HERITAGE MUSEUM A FACELIFT


In keeping with the celebration of Paramount Pictures’ 100th anniversary, the motion picture production company is putting some loving care into the building where their company was born - the Lasky-DeMille barn. The 1901 Hollywood stable was built by Col. Robert Northam, and later sold to Jacob Stern. Stern was the owner when it became a film studio in 1912. It was later rented to the Lasky Company, which purchased the property. The Lasky Company merged with Adolph Zukor’s Famous Players Film Company and the Paramount Distributing Company to become Paramount Pictures Corporation. In 1979, Paramount donated the barn to Hollywood Heritage. Today it is the Hollywood Heritage Museum, operated since 1985 by Hollywood Heritage, a membership based non-profit, with an all-volunteer management and staff.


Paramount Pictures, along with the National Trust for Historic Preservation’s Los Angeles County Preservation Fund, provided funds to prepare the building for a “new” coat of paint. The current painting of this California State Landmark returns the building to its original color scheme when Paramount was born.


Numerous researchers and historians both in and outside of the organization aided Hollywood Heritage in discovering the building’s construction date and color. Subsequent detailed paint studies taken from those remote portions of the building least changed in the last hundred years was conducted by Historic Resources Group of Pasadena, and confirmed descriptions in newspaper accounts of the building as “The Gray Lady” and leading it to be returned to a glorious gray once more (with a bit of dark green and white trim).


Paramount Pictures will provide both the paint and skilled labor to accomplish this restoration, which is anticipated to be completed by the end of March. “We are so gratified that Paramount Pictures has joined this restoration project, helping us to commemorate the building and the company’s history. As the sole link between early agrarian Hollywood and the entertainment capital it is today, this is an important landmark” said Hollywood Heritage president, Richard Adkins. Of equal importance is the donation by the Cecil B. DeMille Foundation of the refurbishing of the second story of the museum with new climate controlled storage and archival facilities.


Currently on display at the museum is an exhibit provided by Paramount Pictures and the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences Foundation of photographs and artifacts from 100 years of Paramount films. The museum which is located at 2100 N. Highland Ave. is open Wednesday through Sunday noon to 4 p.m. Admission is $7.00 and children under twelve are admitted free. Visit us online at www.hollywoodheritage.org


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Karie (site owner) Written by Karie (site owner)
Mar. 14, 2012 | 7:56 PM





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10 Good Reasons to see NAPOLEON

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WE WANT YOU TO SEE NAPOLEON….AND HERE ARE 10 GOOD REASONS WHY!

We want to share with you an article posted by Thomas Gladysz this week on SFGate and The Huffington Post. Thomas details ten compelling reasons why everyone should go see our monumental presentation of NAPOLEON at the Oakland Paramount (March 24, 25, 31, April 1) - we couldn’t have said it better ourselves. Following are his ten great reasons, with excerpts from the article:


10) BACKGROUND: “[Film historian Kevin Brownlow has] spent much of his life piecing together this lost masterpiece which had been dismissed, neglected, cut up, reworked, and scattered by the winds of time.”

9) KEVIN BROWNLOW: “In the March issue of Vanity Fair, Martin Scorsese wrote, ‘If you love silent movies, Kevin Brownlow should be your hero.’”

8) SETTING: “Thanks in part to [the Oakland Paramount] - a temple to the motion picture experience - movie-goers who attend Napoleon may well find themselves spellbound in darkness.”

7) MUSIC: “[Carl Davis’ score is] a marathon and masterful work of film scoring which has twice been expanded to keep up with newly found footage.”

6) CARL DAVIS: “Davis has written music for more than 100 television programs and feature films, but is best known for creating music to accompany silent films, including key Brownlow restorations.”

5) BIGGER AND BETTER: “This current and likely final restoration, completed in 2000 but not previously seen outside Europe, reclaims more than 30 minutes of additional footage discovered since the earlier restorations while visually upgrading much of the film.”

4) GREATEST FILM EVER MADE: “Here is what Vincent Canby had to say in 1981 in the pages of the New York Times. ‘...One suddenly realizes that there once was a film that justified all of the adjectives that have subsequently been debased by critics as well as advertising copywriters. Napoleon sweeps; it takes the breath away; it moves; it dazzles.’”

3) POLYVISION: “There are few movies so innovative, so daring and so hugely ambitious… For the finale, the screen expands to three times its normal width - a kind of triptych - while showing panoramic views and montages of images. There really hasn’t been anything else like it, not even Cinerama… Prepare to be amazed.”

2) VALUE: “For a five and a half hour movie (the length of three contemporary films) accompanied by a live symphony orchestra (a concert ticket too), the ticket prices to Napoleon are rather inexpensive.”

1) EXPERIENCE: “In ten or twenty or thirty years, when this screening of Napoleon is only a memory, film lovers will ask - were you there? ‘Did you see the Napoleon at the Paramount in 2012?’”


CLICK HERE TO READ THE ENTIRE ARTICLE

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