Film RadarFilm Radar

advertisement

advertise with Film Radar
Reviews
Gordon S. Miller Written by Gordon S. Miller
Jan. 2, 2008
Reviews





Email Print

THERE WILL BE BLOOD

Inspired by the first 150 pages of Upton Sinclair’s 1927 novel, Oil, and The Dark Side of Fortune, a biography of oil tycoon Edward Doheny, Paul Thomas Anderson continues his examination of the state of California with his look back at the oil boom at the turn of the twentieth century. 

Daniel Plainview is a struggling silver miner who finally finds his true calling as an oilman.  He is driven, intelligent, and ruthless.  He adopts a baby, later named H.W., who is orphaned in the fields.  His successes make him an equal to companies like Standard Oil and cause townsfolk to seek him out for his expertise.

One in particular is a young man named Paul Sunday.  He comes to sell Daniel information about potential oil fields.  Daniel agrees to offer some money up front and the rest if Paul’s story is correct and fruitful.  Paul tells him about the town of Little Boston, CA, and the oil found on his family’s farm.  Daniel investigates and discovers Paul was telling the truth, so he negotiates with Paul’s father, Abel Sunday, and works to buy all the land in the area from the other homesteaders. 

He is impeded from his normal course of business by Paul’s brother, Eli, the local preacher of the community, who wants to make sure his family and his church are recipients of a fair share of the forthcoming riches.  They remain rivals throughout their lives, this businessman and preacher man, one-upping each other whenever possible to reveal who follows the wrong path, unaware they are traveling beside each other. 

In the dogged pursuit of wealth and prosperity, many sacrifices are made at a great cost by all involved.  The film concludes with a long epilogue, where the relationship of Daniel and H.W., and Daniel and Eli are resolved, leaving the viewer questioning the true and total value of their decisions.

Daniel Day-Lewis is brilliant in his performance of Daniel Plainview, captivating every moment he is on screen.  We spend over 30 years over the course of the film with him and run through a range of emotions toward him.  The best acting job of not only this year, but many a year, it’s one for the ages.

While Anderson has made impressive films so far, the writer/director ascends to another level with There Will Be Blood.  He creates an authentic world in his recreation of California’s past and with frequent collaborator cinematographer Robert Elswit exquisitely reveals the beauty of the American desert in a manner not seen since the photography of Ansel Adams.  It needs to be seen on a large screen and deserves to be mentioned alongside classic epics from Hollywood’s past.


Post the First Comment!

rule